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P1000 1000-5 Alignment

Robobrainiac

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Jul 15, 2020
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I did some searching on here to see what some recommendations are for alignment and I saw most recommended around 1/8" toe in. I am curious if anyone knows any real angle measurements for toe, camber, caster, ect.. I am a mechanic for GM and I am contemplating taking the pioneer in tomorrow and putting it on our hunter alignment machine and see what it shows. I have a new 2020 deluxe that the steering adjustment has not been touched since purchase. Does anyone have any thoughts on this?
 
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DDDonkey

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Unless you have aftermarket a arms, you cannot adjust the toe or camber on the rears. You can only adjust the toe of the stock a-arms on the front. To adjust the camber you need an aftermarket a arms like these SATV ones or other similar brand.
 
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Spoonbill

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Apr 24, 2020
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I did some searching on here to see what some recommendations are for alignment and I saw most recommended around 1/8" toe in. I am curious if anyone knows any real angle measurements for toe, camber, caster, ect.. I am a mechanic for GM and I am contemplating taking the pioneer in tomorrow and putting it on our hunter alignment machine and see what it shows. I have a new 2020 deluxe that the steering adjustment has not been touched since purchase. Does anyone have any thoughts on this?
I’ve been told you can not make any adjustments on a P1K 5 D or LE
 

Robobrainiac

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Jul 15, 2020
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From what I understand and from what I can see, front toe is the only factory adjustment that you can make. I am just curious what the measurements are for the machine overall.
 

t-bear

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Nov 11, 2019
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From what I understand and from what I can see, front toe is the only factory adjustment that you can make. I am just curious what the measurements are for the machine overall.
The front end toe in specs are based off the non adjustable rear tires.

My string method adjustment was based off all 4 wheel/tires being tthe same w 1" rear spacers.

I got my fronts to about 3/16 inch. Driver was out 1/8 and pass good.
 

t-bear

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My above comments are inreference to the factory toe in specs that I posted 2-3 posts avove. This is for the front end only.
 
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Robobrainiac

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Jul 15, 2020
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So my steering wheel was just slightly off to the right when cruising down the road. Offroad you could not tell it was off. I put the pioneer into the alignment rack and I was a little surprised at the results. Mainly the right rear. Total toe was .85 so I kept it around there. The only real annoyance is that now my steering wheel is now apparently crooked to the left so I need to redo it. I have to set the alignment machine to a vehicle on order to get any readings but the vehicle listed does not change the result. It only gives you specifications. I chose a spark just because I felt it resembled the wheel base. I checked the right rear today and made sure everything was tight and nothing looks bent. My rig is a 2020 pioneer 1000-5 and it had 29 miles on it during the alignment. I reset the machine 4 times to make sure the readings were correct. I am not sure if maybe the readings are so strange because of tires or maybe the alignment machine just doesn't like the utv. This is my first Utv alignment. Otherwise I align cars and trucks daily :p

IMG_20200731_180607.jpg
 
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Robobrainiac

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This is a comparison of both before and after adjustment. I made some tape measurements prior to and after as well. I only measured from the inside of the wheels. Prior to adjustment measured on the front 46 1/2 and on the rear of the wheel 46 5/8. After adjustment I measured 46 1/4 and on the rear of the wheel 46 1/2

IMG_20200804_063905.jpg
 

t-bear

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Nov 11, 2019
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1000-5
Awesome. Thanks. Wish I understood it though. Maybe less beers.

Serious question. Did you experience any abnormal tire wire on the rear tires? I ask as my 2019 Basic P1K5 had more tire wear on the front driver (expected as it was 1/8" toe out) but the rear driver tire also showed abnormal wear. Weird to me.

At first I was thinking that is the drive wheel (but is not the passenger rear wheel the drive wheel in 2WD Turf mode?) or driver weight (I'm only 230 clothed and stuff).
 

Robobrainiac

Active Member
Jul 15, 2020
134
215
43
Missouri
Ownership

1000-5
Awesome. Thanks. Wish I understood it though. Maybe less beers.

Serious question. Did you experience any abnormal tire wire on the rear tires? I ask as my 2019 Basic P1K5 had more tire wear on the front driver (expected as it was 1/8" toe out) but the rear driver tire also showed abnormal wear. Weird to me.

At first I was thinking that is the drive wheel (but is not the passenger rear wheel the drive wheel in 2WD Turf mode?) or driver weight (I'm only 230 clothed and stuff).
So far I haven't seen any wear yet. I weigh 200 and when I did the alignment the machine had 29 miles on it and as of today I have 68 miles on it. I may need more mileage to see some tire wear. I am usually always in turf mode unless I ma playing then I am in 2wd. If I get stuck I use 4wd. I have only had it in 4wd twice. I used it once to test and once I got stuck in a mud hole and both times 4wd worked perfectly.
 
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0860silverado

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Awesome. Thanks. Wish I understood it though. Maybe less beers.

Serious question. Did you experience any abnormal tire wire on the rear tires? I ask as my 2019 Basic P1K5 had more tire wear on the front driver (expected as it was 1/8" toe out) but the rear driver tire also showed abnormal wear. Weird to me.

At first I was thinking that is the drive wheel (but is not the passenger rear wheel the drive wheel in 2WD Turf mode?) or driver weight (I'm only 230 clothed and stuff).
There is no single "drive wheel" in turf mode. All open differentials, dictated by the laws of physics, exert exactly the same amount of torque to each axle at all times. (IOW, both tires are always providing the same amount forward or rearward propulsion.)
 
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t-bear

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Nov 11, 2019
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There is no single "drive wheel" in turf mode. All open differentials, dictated by the laws of physics, exert exactly the same amount of torque to each axle at all times. (IOW, both tires are always providing the same amount forward or rearward propulsion.)
Huh. Could have sworn one rear tire was active and one not like an old open diff truck.

Curious... Why might my driver rear show more wear than the rear passenger? Factory frame geometry issue? Thanks.
 
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0860silverado

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Huh. Could have sworn one rear tire was active and one not like an old open diff truck.

Curious... Why might my driver rear show more wear than the rear passenger? Factory frame geometry issue? Thanks.
A number of factors will contribute to uneven rear tire wear. A few being... unequal tire pressure, weight difference, driving patterns (i.e. continually turning left while accelerating around a track, out of alignment, defective shock absorber, opposite side stuck brake caliper. And no offense, but an old open diff truck will also always provide the exact same torque to both axles. The reason only one tire usually spins when doing a burnout is because the tire with the least traction will completely lose traction first and begin to spin, thus leaving both rear axles under even less torque load than before the tire lost traction. So, now the axle not spinning has even less torque load. It's the reason old tractors had separate rear brake pedals. If one tire lost traction in the mud and the other was on hard ground, the operator would apply the brake to the spinning tire, thus increasing the torque load to that axle, which transfers that same torque load to the opposite side, increasing until the machine would move forward.
 
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