12 Foot Tilt Trailer?????

Jankyeye

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Torsion axels are notoriously hard on aluminum frames IMO…but are necessary because everyone wants a low slung trailer (not sure why as they suck off the pavement). There is a ton of moment force on the bolted section.

Not to mention that a p1k is nearly maxing out the single torsion axel limit without factoring in shock loading.

It’s been my experience that if your buying an aluminum trailer, you want a leaf spring setup.

The picture shown earlier, while not a perfect weld, it is sufficient, is a sign of what I speak of.
I hear what your saying about the torsion axle, makes since. That broken weld was after the original repair. It had less than 1500 miles, all but 100 or so empty. Pulled it from Ohio to Maryland to Florida all empty as part of a move.

The sticker says 2340lbs carrying capacity. Never weighted the P1K5 but surly I havnt added that much weight. If I had it to do over I would have sprung for a tandem axle. I was trying to keep it light because I expected to pull it behind the sxs more.
 
ToddACimer

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Torsion axels are notoriously hard on aluminum frames IMO…but are necessary because everyone wants a low slung trailer (not sure why as they suck off the pavement). There is a ton of moment force on the bolted section.

Not to mention that a p1k is nearly maxing out the single torsion axel limit without factoring in shock loading.

It’s been my experience that if your buying an aluminum trailer, you want a leaf spring setup.

The picture shown earlier, while not a perfect weld, it is sufficient, is a sign of what I speak of.
Aluminum trailers in general are garbage. Fool me once shame on me ... But there won't be a second chance
 
CID

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Aluminum trailers in general are garbage. Fool me once shame on me ... But there won't be a second chance
The problem with aluminum is that alum doesn't like cyclic loading, the exact life a trailer is subjected to. Yeah, they're light and easy to move and tow but they aren't a long term investment, like it or not.
 
Nevada Notch

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For all you aluminum haters, metal trailers aren't exactly fool proof either.
The whole point of replacing my last trailer was because of a bent and broken gate on my 2 year old steel trailer.

No trailer regardless of what it's made from it is not going to last if overloaded and abused and no mine wasn't overloaded or abused..... Just plain s***ty materials and craftsmanship.

My last two steel trailers I have had to re-weld the tailgates back together because of weld fractures......

Rand
 
ToddACimer

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The problem with aluminum is that alum doesn't like cyclic loading, the exact life a trailer is subjected to. Yeah, they're light and easy to move and tow but they aren't a long term investment, like it or not.
I definitely agree. Aluminum car haulers specifically are only rated for 1 distributed load and they don't like hauling 2 side-by-sides. Mine cracked right in the middle of the deck. The fenders also had cracked in a dozen places. I ended up with a full steel subframe and I still didn't feel comfortable with the long term fatigue.
 
HBarlow

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There are many trailer manufacturers scattered all across the nation. Utility trailers are cheap and easy to build and any welder can buy steel, a few manufactured parts sourced from China, and call himself a trailer builder.

The problem is many are built with cheap, undersized steel. Some of the trailers coming out of Elkhart, IN are among thew worst.

Look for a brand name with a history and reputation. Be prepared to pay a little more,

Consider buying one with extra cost higher-rated axles and 16" wheels and light-truck tires.

Big Tex is an excellent builder. So is Kaufman. A good trailer will last for many years and tolerate overloading and abuse.
 
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L

LarryAmboy

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Aluminum trailers in general are garbage. Fool me once shame on me ... But there won't be a second chance

I would disagree with this statement. There is some lower quality aluminum out there but also some quality aluminum trailers.

Www.mheby.com

Take a look at either EBY or ALUMA. I have 3 EBY ( deck over equipment, dump, and stock trailer) and 1 ALUMA ( 6x10 for P1000-5). One of my EBY has over 70,000 miles and is in like new condition and NO rust. Trailers weighs less so more payload. All of my aluminum trailers have torsion suspension and have no issues. Frequently haul max loads on my EBY 14k deck over, farm equipment and hay.

EBY makes trailers from small all the way up to semi trailers. They certainly cost more but you get what you pay for.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
ToddACimer

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I would disagree with this statement. There is some lower quality aluminum out there but also some quality aluminum trailers.

Www.mheby.com

Take a look at either EBY or ALUMA. I have 3 EBY ( deck over equipment, dump, and stock trailer) and 1 ALUMA ( 6x10 for P1000-5). One of my EBY has over 70,000 miles and is in like new condition and NO rust. Trailers weighs less so more payload. All of my aluminum trailers have torsion suspension and have no issues. Frequently haul max loads on my EBY 14k deck over, farm equipment and hay.

EBY makes trailers from small all the way up to semi trailers. They certainly cost more but you get what you pay for.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

My trailer experience was specific to a Wolverine trailer. At 10k miles the deck cracked where the tongue joined the deck ahead of the axles. I reviewed several trailers including the EBY car haulers and found the only aluminum car hauler that tied the deck to the tongue to be the Suretrac trailers. I bought Suretrac fenders and a suretrac subframe. The parts fit very well and I bolted the deck to the tongue of my wolverine trailer with the Suretrac parts. Similar to the EBY and suretrac trailers I added tube under the deck behind the axles. After another 10k miles I couldn't keep the subframe bolts tight. I hauled a distributed 6k payload with 2 side by sides.

When looking for a new trailer I reconsidered most aluminum brands. EBY, Suretrac and aluma all do not make a 10k 24ft trailer, which was my only option for better weight distribution. I instead opted for a 24ft steel Retro after seeing similar cracked deck issues from most other brands on high mileage car haulers.

Most aluminum trailers recommend 1 single payload tied to the front and rear which stiffens the deck to reduce fatigue. It didn't work for 2 side by sides on only a 20ft trailer.

I realize I tow a lot more than most people in both miles and weight but in order to keep my family safe aluminum was not a good option. Wolverine also has a terrible warranty.

1000003529
 
100Acre

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This has been a very educational thread. Thanks all…!
I have always towed steel. The only time I ever had a bent ramp was from driving a tractor up it. Aluminum, although lite is prone to being brittle. I tend to drive long highway distances and rough gravel or rocky roads. I’m an concerned with length though. I think I will ever only pull one machine. If I need to pull more then I can just use my 22 foot Kaufman tilt bed. I wanna get something long enough for a 1000–5 trail or four seater Talon. An enclosed trailer seems really nice, but I feel in some ways that it would be too much wind obstruction, even if being towed behind my truck camper. Also the cost. If I go the Steel trailer route, with either machine, plus I’d like to add a job box to the front of the trailer for storing a generator and maybe some tools. I don’t think I want to go any longer than 16 feet though.
And remember to always carry the most perfect shape chunk of firewood for when your leaf spring snaps on a late Friday afternoon far away from home!
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ChadD

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This has been a very educational thread. Thanks all…!
I have always towed steel. The only time I ever had a bent ramp was from driving a tractor up it. Aluminum, although lite is prone to being brittle. I tend to drive long highway distances and rough gravel or rocky roads. I’m an concerned with length though. I think I will ever only pull one machine. If I need to pull more then I can just use my 22 foot Kaufman tilt bed. I wanna get something long enough for a 1000–5 trail or four seater Talon. An enclosed trailer seems really nice, but I feel in some ways that it would be too much wind obstruction, even if being towed behind my truck camper. Also the cost. If I go the Steel trailer route, with either machine, plus I’d like to add a job box to the front of the trailer for storing a generator and maybe some tools. I don’t think I want to go any longer than 16 feet though.
And remember to always carry the most perfect shape chunk of firewood for when your leaf spring snaps on a late Friday afternoon far away from home!
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Redneck engineering at it's finest 😎👍
 
Vikes79

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Aluminum trailers in general are garbage. Fool me once shame on me ... But there won't be a second chance
I have a locally fabricated 18’+2’ Aluminum car trailer that I bought in 2016 direct from the factory location. It’s been a sweet trailer for what it is. It’s been a perfect car / light truck hauler. I haul my restored small tractors, and my project restoration vehicles with it all the time. The removable fenders are really handy.


I also haul my smaller Gehl skid steer with it…but I don’t really like loading it on the trailer…

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IMG 4829
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IMG 5612


I inspected my trailer before buying. It’s a really well built design that I’d recommend to anyone…but for sure you get what you pay for. I’ve seen some cheap ass aluminum trailers out there. I’d estimate that I have around 20k miles on this trailer in the picture…maybe more? I wouldn’t hesitate taking it on a big cross country trip with a vehicle on it.

The mass produced bargain basement types I’d avoid. A lot of corners are being cut in the trailer making business these days.
 
Vikes79

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For all you aluminum haters, metal trailers aren't exactly fool proof either.
The whole point of replacing my last trailer was because of a bent and broken gate on my 2 year old steel trailer.

No trailer regardless of what it's made from it is not going to last if overloaded and abused and no mine wasn't overloaded or abused..... Just plain s***ty materials and craftsmanship.

My last two steel trailers I have had to re-weld the tailgates back together because of weld fractures......

Rand
For me it’s not Aluminum hating….its more understanding of the design.

Aluminum is a fantastic material when used correctly. Steel to aluminum connections must account for the difference in flex. My comment about the aluminum single torsion axels is about the design of the mounting and how it moves. Spring axels tend to spread out when loaded. The torsion rotates and a twisting force is applied to the mounts on the frame. Usually the mounts are not very long in length meaning a high torque applied to the connections. If the steel torsion mounts were longer on @Jankyeye trailer, I doubt he’d see the stress fractures.

Think of these smaller single axel trailers as teeter totters going down the road with nearly equal weight on each end. Something is always flexing…I prefer leaf springs on these trailers with sizable volume tires ….
 
ToddACimer

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I have a locally fabricated 18’+2’ Aluminum car trailer that I bought in 2016 direct from the factory location. It’s been a sweet trailer for what it is. It’s been a perfect car / light truck hauler. I haul my restored small tractors, and my project restoration vehicles with it all the time. The removable fenders are really handy.


I also haul my smaller Gehl skid steer with it…but I don’t really like loading it on the trailer…

View attachment 419082View attachment 419083View attachment 419084View attachment 419085View attachment 419086

I inspected my trailer before buying. It’s a really well built design that I’d recommend to anyone…but for sure you get what you pay for. I’ve seen some cheap ass aluminum trailers out there. I’d estimate that I have around 20k miles on this trailer in the picture…maybe more? I wouldn’t hesitate taking it on a big cross country trip with a vehicle on it.

The mass produced bargain basement types I’d avoid. A lot of corners are being cut in the trailer making business these days.
2 good things about that trailer are the short tongue, so you don't have an abrupt change in stiffness at the axles and it's short enough that you probably can't haul 2 things across the axles. Your trailer likely flexes more than mine but it happens over 4 ft not 1 specific spot.
 
CID

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fwiw: I mentioned aluminum's dislike for cyclic loading, the reason for that is - any flex in any metal causes work hardening to some degree. Work hardening causes brittleness, brittleness causes cracking. Since alum flexes more than steel, it becomes brittle faster, leading to cracks. Once it becomes brittle, alum will crack sooner than steel. If built stout enough to minimize flexing, alum loses much of its weight advantage.

Why alum tends to fail at the welds - extruded alum is generally tempered to T-6, considered to be a suitable strength compromise without becoming brittle. But a weld eliminates that temper, resulting in T-0. It will eventually age harden to T-3 or T-4 but will never regain T-6 strength. Trying to re-temper a welded alum trailer would be cost prohibitive, that's not going to happen. That's why so many alum structures, including trailers, have many bolted connections.
 
Vikes79

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2 good things about that trailer are the short tongue, so you don't have an abrupt change in stiffness at the axles and it's short enough that you probably can't haul 2 things across the axles. Your trailer likely flexes more than mine but it happens over 4 ft not 1 specific spot.
I purchased it back in the days when the largest truck I had was a F150 and the only load it saw was tractor shows and the such. What is unique on this trailer is the axels are connected together by a steel channel subframe that is extending length wise in the trailer.

My F350 pulls it empty down the interstate like it’s a piece of paper fluttering in the wind…I’ve seen daylight under the wheels plenty of times lol. I don’t really like that part.
 
ToddACimer

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I purchased it back in the days when the largest truck I had was a F150 and the only load it saw was tractor shows and the such. What is unique on this trailer is the axels are connected together by a steel channel subframe that is extending length wise in the trailer.

My F350 pulls it empty down the interstate like it’s a piece of paper fluttering in the wind…I’ve seen daylight under the wheels plenty of times lol. I don’t really like that part.
Mine too. It had a full steel subframe. Where the tongue ended and subframe started is where is cracked
 
Nevada Notch

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Got the E Tracks laid down. What a pain in the @#$%!

The underside of this trailer has reinforcement on each of the individual deck slats and additional welded support bars that wood deck trailers don't have making it difficult to attach the nylock mounting nuts on the underside.
E Chock
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